School Philosophy

School Philosophy Papers

kindergartenbooks 2bKindergarten Literacy Philosophy

In September 2015 the Board of Trustees of Garden Valley School Division presented its philosophy paper on Kindergarten Literacy. The purpose of this philosophy paper is to outline the division's core beliefs about literacy development at the Kindegarten level, and also identify the year end expectations for literacy in Kindergarten. The document outlines the importance of implementing programming components for literacy succes and also assessing students' success. The Kindergarten Literacy document presents a reading and writing instruction 'checklist' which can be used when planning literacy programs and assessing children’s acquisition of literacy skills.

“As Kindergarten teachers, we stand almost at the beginning of the journey. It is an awesome responsibility. Not only must we acknowledge what children bring to school from family and community, but we must be smart enough to know how to use that knowledge to transform teaching and learning in our classrooms. In order to keep all children on track, we need to be knowledgeable about literacy…”
- Ann McGill Franzen.

To read the entire document, see pdfKindergarten_Literacy_Philosophy_Paper.pdf 

 

Middle Years Philosophy

In November 2004 the Board of Trustees of Garden Valley School Division released a Philosophy Position Paper on Middle School Education. The purpose of this philosophy paper is to articulate broad understandings of middle school learners, and how middle schools in Garden Valley School Division can meet the educational needs of young adolescent learners.

The purpose and functions of exemplary middle schools center on the intellectual, social, emotional, moral, and physical developmental needs of young adolescents (Clark & Clark, 1993; National Middle School Association, 1995). Within a few years, young adolescents undergo rapid physical growth, changes in moral reasoning, the onset of abstract thinking, and introduction to a range of social pressures, including sex, drugs, and violence. Simultaneously, the lifelong developmental tasks of forming a personal identity or self-concept, acquiring social skills, gaining autonomy, and developing character and a set of values are begun (Irvin, 1995). Exemplary middle level programs foster appropriate programs, policies, and practices that foster the development of these tasks in positive ways.

 

High School Philosophy

In November 2009 the Board of Trustees of Garden Valley School Division adopted a philosophy paper on high school education. The purpose of the philosophy paper is to articulate broad understandings of high school learners and how secondary education in Garden Valley School Division can meet the educational needs of these learners.

 The paper has three main categories:

Part 1 - highlights the general characteristics of young adolescents and outlines educational implications for initiatives related to their learning.

Part 2 - is a profile of Garden Valley School Division. In an attempt to create a deeper understanding of the type of learners that will be educated in our high schools, it is important to understand the community in which they live.

Part 3 - examines the components of an exemplary high school. A responsive high school program will have specific characteristics that contribute to a positive learning environment. These characteristics support higher levels of student achievement and overall development.

To download the entire document see: pdfPhilosophy_Position_High_School-November_10_2009.pdf